Aboriginal dance


Goomblar Wylo is an Australian Aboriginal, whom performs traditional dances, plays the didgeridoo, clap sticks, story telling and much, much more. Goomblar has travelled throughout the world performing in schools, universities, conferences, hotels and resorts.

Traditional Indigenous Australian dance was closely associated with song and was understood and experienced as making present the reality of the Dreamtime. In some instances, they would imitate the actions of a particular animal in the process of telling a story. For the people in their own country it defined to roles, responsibilities and the place itself. These ritual performances gave them an understanding of themselves in the interplay of social, geographical and environmental forces. The performances were associated with specific places and dance grounds were often sacred places. Body decoration and specific gestures related to kin and other relationships (such as to Dreamtime beings with which individuals and groups). For a number of Indigenous Australian groups their dances were secret and or sacred, gender could also be an important factor in some ceremonies with men and women having separate ceremonial traditions.

Australia's Aboriginal people have no written language. The legends and the stories of their past have been kept alive in song and dance.



The term Corroboree is commonly used in general Australian culture to refer to Australian Aboriginal dances, however this term has its origins among the people of the Sydney region. In a number of places Australian Aboriginal people will perform "corroborees" for tourists.

In the latter part of the 20th century the influence of Indigenous Australian dance traditions has been seen with the development of concert dance, particularly in contemporary dance with the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association providing training to Indigenous Australians in dance and the Bangarra Dance Theatre.

The Djilpin Dancers are seen here performing at the Darwin Festival, a must-see event if you're ever in the Northern Territory in the dry season!